May 9

Kosair Charities sues Norton, claims hospital system refuses to account for Kosair Children’s Hospital funding

kosair1It’s been a combative, litigious year on the local health-care front, and here’s just one example: Kosair Charities sued Norton Healthcare, which manages and staffs Kosair Children’s Hospital.

Kosair Charities accused Norton of funneling millions of dollars from the charity into its general fund, refusing to account for how that money — meant solely to aide Kosair pediatric patients — is spent. In addition, the suit claims Norton is using its Kosair name and revenue in violation of earlier agreements.

That lawsuit is ongoing.

May 14

U of L Trustee Steve Wilson: ‘Sometimes loyalty means asking questions’

steve wilson

Steve Wilson didn’t mince words when he talked about how the University of Louisville expects its trustees to fall in line. “The businessman’s main point is that administration officials equate loyalty with docility,” IL wrote, adding the university often sees curious trustees as disloyal. Wilson added that at U of L, the tendency is to “address issues in trustee meetings, or in committee meetings, as if they’re already settled.”

”The response is always, ‘People think this is a problem? Guess what … it’s not a problem,’” Wilson said to IL.

Apparently when Wilson asked to read a copy of the then long-awaited U of L audit, he was told he couldn’t keep it and would have to go to the office of President James Ramsey to review it. Overall, Wilson was upset that the culture among trustees was to support the university in all things. He didn’t agree. “Sometimes loyalty means asking questions.”

May 28

Official: Kent Oyler is the new CEO of GLI

Kent-Oyler-large-676x451

GLI had a year of ups and downs, but the organization sought to right the ship via the hiring of Kent Oyler as its CEO, which was official May 28. Oyler was the managing partner of OPM Services, and took over the gig from acting CEO Eileen Pickett.

One of Oyler’s first priorities was to ensure that GLI stems the membership-outflows that had plagued the organization since the Great Recession took hold. Oyler said he had to make it clear why they needed GLI. “I have to carefully define the value proposition, so they understand the value of GLI.”

IL sat down with Oyler right after the announcement and he discussed some challenges and priorities. One issue was that the city seemed to withdraw funding and support from GLI. What did he think about that? “On our net basis that’s only 10 percent of our budget,” he said. “Ninety percent is not related to the city.” He also expressed that he saw part of his job as simply being around to build relationships with people. “It sounds soft, but it’s not.”